For example, if an app developer gave you their 99-cent app for free for you to review it, that information might not have much effect on the weight that readers give to your review. But if the app developer also gave you $100, knowledge of that payment would have a much greater effect on the credibility of your review. So a disclosure that simply said you got the app for free wouldn’t be good enough, but as discussed above, you don’t have to disclose exactly how much you were paid.
2. Commissions – John writes that he’s not satisfied with a 4% commission. He’s right in some ways, 4% isn’t that much when you’re selling a $10 book – however when you’re selling a Get a Price on the $5000 Camera or a $25,000 Tractor (I know someone who does quite well out of ride on mowers and tractors) it certainly adds up. Not only that, the 4% rate that John talks about is the base rate. Unfortunately it is as high as it goes on consumer electronics – however on most other products there is a sliding scale where the more you sell the higher your commission goes to. Sell more than 6 items in a month and your commission goes to 6% – sell over 630 and you’re up to 8% (the rate I’m on). The 4-Hour work Week that John uses as an example earned me around $1 a book. Still not a lot – but I did sell 100 or so of them (after my interview with it’s author) which not only earned me $100 but also helped push the numbers of sales up for the month, moving me into the next earning bracket.
Affiliates discussed the issues in Internet forums and began to organize their efforts. They believed that the best way to address the problem was to discourage merchants from advertising via adware. Merchants that were either indifferent to or supportive of adware were exposed by affiliates, thus damaging those merchants' reputations and tarnishing their affiliate marketing efforts. Many affiliates either terminated the use of such merchants or switched to a competitor's affiliate program. Eventually, affiliate networks were also forced by merchants and affiliates to take a stand and ban certain adware publishers from their network. The result was Code of Conduct by Commission Junction/beFree and Performics,[31] LinkShare's Anti-Predatory Advertising Addendum,[32] and ShareASale's complete ban of software applications as a medium for affiliates to promote advertiser offers.[33] Regardless of the progress made, adware continues to be an issue, as demonstrated by the class action lawsuit against ValueClick and its daughter company Commission Junction filed on April 20, 2007.[34]
A purchase by a Referred Customer engaging in "Domain Speculation," which is determined by the identification of two (2) web hosting accounts with the same Referred Customer's name, email address, or other identifying characteristic as determined by FatCow and/or the identification of two (2) or more web hosting accounts that have no content on their websites or have similar content, templates or formatting, as determined by FatCow, in our sole discretion.

The Program Operator does not tolerate the sending of unsolicited bulk emails (UCE or SPAM) which promote, or make reference to the Program Operator, or any of their associated companies or websites, Partners, or employees, the websites, products or services. The provisions of the Terms and Conditions pertaining to UCE or SPAM shall apply to each affiliate. Any affiliate who, in the opinion of the Program Operator, breaches this rule will have their affiliate status canceled and any outstanding commissions will be forfeited.


(b) displaying Special Links and Program Content on your Site in compliance with the Agreement, all applicable laws, ordinances, rules, regulations, orders, licenses, permits, guidelines, codes of practice, industry standards, self-regulatory rules, judgments, decisions, or other requirements of any applicable governmental authority, including those related to disclosures (for example, if applicable, the U.S. FTC Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsement and Testimonials in Advertising) and electronic marketing, data protection and privacy (for example, if applicable, the Directive 2002/58/EC (Privacy and Electronic Communications Directive), and the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) (EU) 2016/679), and any agreement between you and any other person or entity (including any restrictions or requirements placed on you by any person or entity that hosts your Site),
If you have any kind of special deals with your affiliate manager, make sure that you can pass these along. If you can’t, then you need to take that portion out of the business and sell as if you weren’t getting those extra benefits. One of the best ways to transfer these kind of special perks is by also making sure that your affiliate manager becomes the manager for the new buyer as well when they sign up for that network. Most affiliate managers work on a commission basis from the sales that their affiliates are doing, so they will likely be more than happy to do this since your website is already a proven profit maker for them.
You grant to us a non-exclusive license to utilize your name, title, trademarks, and logos (the "Affiliate Trademarks") in any advertisement or other materials used to promote FatCow and the Affiliate Program, provided that FatCow’s use of the Affiliate Trademarks is not required and is at its sole discretion. This license shall terminate upon the termination of your participation in the Affiliate Program.
Are they biting the hand that feeds them? Possibly. We will have to wait and see. Maybe Amazon gave the higher commission %’s to the products that have the highest markup…? i.e. their Amazon coins. I do believe tho they have reduced the incentive their own “affiliate employees” previously had to push their products-and maybe, just maybe this new commission structure will not last long.
Other affiliate programs can have as long as 90-day cookies, meaning anything that visitor buys from that website within 90 days will be attributed to your account. That is a long time, and it can make a big difference in revenue. You will still want to split test this, but by doing so you might find a big win just by switching over to a different affiliate program.
This Agreement contains the entire agreement between the parties, and no representations, statements or inducements, oral or written, not contained herein, shall be binding upon the parties. Company expressly disclaims the making of, and MA acknowledges that it has not received a warranty or guaranty, express or implied, as to the potential volume, profits or success of the business venture contemplated by this Agreement.
Create custom alerts on your phone for affiliate sales – if you use GMail, go to your settings and create a filter so all emails with “SiteGround Affiliate Sale Generated” in the subject line go into their own folder (tweak the subject line to match whatever email notification your affiliate sends you). Then setup a custom alert on your phone using the GMail app so anytime you generate a sale, you get a custom alert (here’s a tutorial for Android and here’s one for Apple). I have different notifications for SiteGround, StudioPress Themes, etc. Makes your day better :)
b. Must clearly and conspicuously identify that the message is an advertisement or solicitation, unless recipient has given prior affirmative consent to receipt of the message. Affirmative consent means that the recipient expressly consented to receive the message either in response to a clear and conspicuous request for such consent or at the recipient's own initiative.
The Program Operator does not tolerate the sending of unsolicited bulk emails (UCE or SPAM) which promote, or make reference to the Program Operator, or any of their associated companies or websites, Partners, or employees, the websites, products or services. The provisions of the Terms and Conditions pertaining to UCE or SPAM shall apply to each affiliate. Any affiliate who, in the opinion of the Program Operator, breaches this rule will have their affiliate status canceled and any outstanding commissions will be forfeited.
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